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Italian police Ferrari 250 GTE for sale — and it’s going fast

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May 28, 2020
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A stunning 1962 Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 once used as a police pursuit vehicle in Rome is up for sale.

In pristine condition, if you need to ask how much it will cost, you probably can’t afford to buy it as it is expected to go for as much as a million euros.

The Ferrari 250 GTE was the first production 2+2 from Maranello, offering the ultimate Gran Turismo experience to drivers who like to travel with speed, comfort and all the flair the prancing horse Ferrari logo could offer. 

Ferrari 350 GTE

All pictures courtesy of Tom Gidden Photography.

Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 was unveiled at Le Mans

Unveiled at the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans where it was the course marshal’s car, the Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 became one of Enzo Ferrari’s most successful models, combining all of the essential ingredients a Ferrari should have, a front-mounted V12 engine and ladder-frame chassis, all swathed in an elegant Pininfarina body.

Police in Rome ordered two Ferrari cars in 1962 to help in their pursuit of crooks who invested in faster and faster getaway cars. 

With its 3.0 litre, V12 engine and top speed in excess of 250 kmh, the 250 GTE was set to become a game changer for crime fighting forces in the Eternal City. 

Completed by Ferrari in November 1962, chassis 3999 was finished in black with tan leatherette interior. 

Ferrari 350 GTE

Second Polizia Ferrari was written-off early in service

Ferrari built two of these 250 GTE Polizia models but the other was written off in a high speed pursuit just a few weeks into service leaving 3999 as the beating heart of Rome’s police squad car fleet for the next six years.

Copies of the car’s official service sheets confirm how regularly the Ferrari returned to Maranello for service and maintenance works, ensuring it was always in top condition before being retired from active service in late 1968. It was still in remarkable condition and remained so through to 1972 when it was sold at auction.

Fortunately, the new owner knew what he had acquired and he spent the next 40 years preserving it in its original state. As a result of its legendary status in Italy, the car was loaned to the Museum of Police Vehicles in Rome in the early 2000’s. 

The 3999 is the only private car in Italy with special permission to circulate with siren, blue light and “Squadra Volante” livery.

Ferrari 350 GTE

Italian legend wowed the crowds at Pebble Beach

In 2015 the Ferrari 250 GTE passed to another enthusiastic owner, who took great pride in sharing it with the crowds at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2016. Back in Europe, more event invitations were received, with the car maintaining its legendary status as the ultimate Pantera.

Accompanying 3999 at sale  is a comprehensive history file containing copies of the original Ferrari build sheets and period Polizia documentation.  Copies of the Italian libretto along with this car’s FIVA Identity card and ASI certificate of homologation are also contained within the history file. 

The car was inspected by Ferrari Classiche and awarded its Certificate in 2014. The Ferrari Classiche Certification red binder confirms the car retains its original Ferrari chassis, engine, gearbox and rear axle, an entirely matching numbers example.

Sale notes reveal: “Rarely does the opportunity arise to obtain a truly legendary car. With its mythical status as the only Ferrari Police car, this Pantera is exactly that opportunity. 

“Presented in a beautifully original condition, still wearing its Italian black plates, this Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 Serie II Polizia is ready to be enjoyed as much on the open road, as it is at Concours d’Elegance around the world. Quite simply, this is the ultimate Italian 250 GTE.”

police car

The Ferrari’s best friend – classic car insurance

And what do you need to complement the ultimate Italian Ferrari 250 GTE? The ultimate classic car insurance policy. For an even better deal call 0808 503 4021.

For full sale details visit the Girardo & Co dealer website

Five British classics with transatlantic styling

 




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